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The research in Comparative Global Humanities examines culture, history, and translation to consider the interdependency of peoples, societies, and economies, both throughout history, and in the current era of globalization. This scholarship requires that we build upon the traditional strengths of humanities – languages, textual interpretation, ethics and values – to rethink society, culture, art, religion, and civilization beyond the national unit that previously organized many studies. Comparative Global Humanities considers the longer history of contacts, exchanges and entanglements that link Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas today, and over the course of world history.

Culture, History, and Translation Funded Proposal

Address the longer histories of connection, exchange, and interdependency in ways that unsettle discretely bounded territories, recast received historical periods, and reconsider formerly studied “areas.” By creating a research and scholarship nexus that brings together research faculty strengths in Anthropology, Art History, English, Comparative and Romance Literatures, History, and Religion, to consider the transmission, and adaptation of cultures over the longer world history of contact, encounter, and exchange.

Culture, History, and Translation considers longer histories of connection, exchange, and interdependency in ways that unsettle discretely bounded territories and recast received historical periods, by reconsidering formerly studied “areas” by recasting the global study of Europe, transoceanic studies, hemispheric American studies, global Black diaspora studies, and global Asia studies. Specifically, we critically engage translation as interceding on settled notions of culture and history and as imbricated in constructions of colonialism, race, empire and diaspora.