Open Menu Close Menu Open Search Close Search

The sections below are pre-written Veterinary Care Program descriptions that may be requested by funding agencies and are organized by campus. The NIH recently announced they no longer require this in their Vertebrate Animal Sections (VAS); however, other funding agencies DO require this information.

Boston Campus

Animal procedures will be carried out in full accordance with established standards set forth in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, 8th edition (NIH Publication No. 85-23). The Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine (DLAM) manages and maintains strict control of the animal facilities and use at Tufts University/Tufts Medical Center on the Boston campus. All animals shall be or have been legally obtained from suppliers licensed by the USDA (or exempted) according to 9 CFR, Chapter 1, Subchapter A – Animal Welfare, Parts 1-4.

Dr. Scott Perkins, VMD, MPH, DACLAM is the attending veterinarian and Senior Director of DLAM. Veterinary and diagnostic services are provided throughout the facility by the DLAM, with daily inspections of all animal facilities by full-time, qualified personnel including 2 clinical veterinarians and 1 veterinary pathologist. The animal program couples daily animal observation with appropriate methods for the prevention, control, diagnosis and treatment of animal disease. Treatment plans are based on the clinical assessment and any diagnostics performed to treat the animal’s condition. If an animal’s condition cannot be treated successfully, including the minimization of pain or distress, the animals would be euthanized under the direction of a DLAM veterinarian. The animal program provides for adequate veterinary care at all times. After hour/emergency veterinary care and contact information are available to all investigative staff members across several internal resources. The veterinarian on-call list is provided to the Tufts Police Department.  Lastly, prior to any period of time during which the veterinarians are not available by phone or pager, the attending veterinarian makes specific arrangements with a qualified laboratory animal specialist for veterinary coverage.

The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee established by the Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center, in accordance with the requirements of the law, will review, approve, and perform a congruency review of the proposed procedures prior to the award of funding. The IACUC review requires the description of the phenotype of any mice bred in the facility and the DLAM staff are informed of any phenotypes that may cause clinical manifestations. The IACUC also requires that specific monitoring and clear endpoints be listed in the IACUC protocol. All those working with live research animals must complete required IACUC training(s) prior to animal use. This training includes information about the regulations and institutional policies, as well as, guidance in the areas of model selection, animal handling, animal restraint, anesthesia, analgesia, euthanasia, surgery, and post-surgical care.

The animal care and use program at Tufts University/Tufts Medical Center – Boston Campus has been continuously accredited by AAALAC since 18 April 1966 with the most recent date of March 28, 2017. The program is inspected by the USDA under the research license 14-R-0082, and holds the Public Health Service Policy Assurance number A3775-01.

Grafton Campus

Animal procedures will be carried out in full accordance with established standards set forth in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, 8th edition (NIH Publication No. 85-23). The Laboratory Animal Medicine Service (LAMS) manages and maintains strict control of the animal facilities and use at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University on the Grafton campus. All animals shall be or have been legally obtained from suppliers licensed by the USDA (or exempted) according to 9 CFR, Chapter 1, Subchapter A – Animal Welfare, Parts 1-4.

Dr. David Lee-Parritz, DVM, DACLAM is the attending veterinarian and Director of LAMS. Veterinary and diagnostic services are provided throughout the facility by the LAMS, with daily inspections of all animal facilities by full-time, qualified personnel. The animal program couples daily animal observation with appropriate methods for the prevention, control, diagnosis and treatment of animal disease. Treatment plans are based on the clinical assessment and any diagnostics performed to treat the animal’s condition. If an animal’s condition cannot be treated successfully, including the minimization of pain or distress, the animals would be euthanized under the direction of a LAMS veterinarian. The animal program provides for adequate veterinary care at all times. The procedures for after hour/emergency veterinary care and contact information are available to all investigative staff members across several internal resources. The veterinarian on-call list is provided to the Tufts Police Department.  Lastly, prior to any period of time during which the veterinarians are not available by phone or pager, the attending veterinarian makes specific arrangements with a qualified laboratory animal specialist for veterinary coverage.

The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee established by Tufts University, in accordance with the requirements of the law, will review, approve, and perform a congruency review of the proposed procedures prior to the award of funding. The IACUC review requires the description of the phenotype of any mice bred in the facility and the LAMS staff are informed of any phenotypes that may cause clinical manifestations. The IACUC also requires that specific monitoring and clear endpoints be listed in the IACUC protocol. All those working with live research animals must complete required IACUC training(s) prior to animal use. This training includes information about the regulations and institutional policies, as well as, guidance in the areas of model selection, animal handling, animal restraint, anesthesia, analgesia, euthanasia, surgery, and post-surgical care.

The animal care and use program at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University – Grafton Campus has been continuously accredited by AAALAC since 5 March 1997 with the most recent date of July 7, 2014, is inspected by the USDA under the research license 14-R-0065, and holds the Public Health Service Policy Assurance number A4059-01.

Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA)

Animal procedures will be carried out in full accordance with established standards set forth in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, 8th edition (NIH Publication No. 85-23). The Comparative Biology Unit (CBU) manages and maintains strict control of the animal facilities and use at the Human Nutrition Research Center at Aging (HNRCA) at Tufts University.

Animal care, technical assistance and veterinary services are provided throughout the facility by the CBU, with daily inspections of all animal facilities by full-time, qualified personnel under the direction of CBU Manager Donald Smith, PhD, CMAR, CPIA. Scott Perkins, VMD, MPH, DACLAM, Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine (DLAM), Tufts University, serves as the attending veterinarian to the CBU. The animal program couples daily animal observation with appropriate methods for the prevention, control, diagnosis and treatment of animal disease. Treatment plans are based on the clinical assessment and any diagnostics performed to treat the animal’s condition. If an animal’s condition cannot be treated successfully, including the minimization of pain or distress, the animals would be euthanized under the direction of an attending veterinarian or the CBU Manager. The animal program provides for adequate veterinary care at all times. After hour/emergency veterinary care and contact information for both the attending veterinarian and CBU Manager are available to all investigative staff members across several internal resources. The contact information for the CBU Manager and the veterinarian on-call list is provided to the Tufts Police Department.  Lastly, prior to any period of time during which the veterinarians are not available by phone or pager, the attending veterinarian makes specific arrangements with a qualified laboratory animal specialist for veterinary coverage.

The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee established by the Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center, in accordance with the requirements of the law, will review, approve, and perform a congruency review of the proposed procedures prior to the award of funding. The IACUC review requires the description of the phenotype of any mice bred in the facility and the CBU staff are informed of any phenotypes that may cause clinical manifestations. The IACUC also requires that specific monitoring and clear endpoints be listed in the IACUC protocol. All those working with live research animals must complete required IACUC training(s) prior to animal use. This training includes information about the regulations and institutional policies, as well as, guidance in the areas of model selection, animal handling, animal restraint, anesthesia, analgesia, euthanasia, surgery, and post-surgical care.

The animal care and use program at Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging is accredited by AAALAC and holds the Public Health Service Policy Assurance number A3547-01.

Medford/Somerville Campus

Animal procedures will be carried out in full accordance with established standards set forth in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, 8th edition (NIH Publication No. 85-23). The Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine (DLAM) manages and maintains strict control of the animal facilities and use at Tufts University on the Medford campus. All animals shall be or have been legally obtained from suppliers licensed by the USDA (or exempted) according to 9 CFR, Chapter 1, Subchapter A – Animal Welfare, Parts 1-4.

Dr. Scott Perkins, VMD, MPH, DACLAM is the attending veterinarian and Senior Director of DLAM. Veterinary and diagnostic services are provided throughout the facility by the DLAM, with daily inspections of all animal facilities by full-time, qualified personnel, including 2 clinical veterinarians and 1 veterinary pathologist. The animal program couples daily animal observation with appropriate methods for the prevention, control, diagnosis and treatment of animal disease. Treatment plans are based on the clinical assessment and any diagnostics performed to treat the animal’s condition. If an animal’s condition cannot be treated successfully, including the minimization of pain or distress, the animals would be euthanized under the direction of a DLAM veterinarian.

The animal program provides for adequate veterinary care at all times. The procedures for after hour/emergency veterinary care and contact information are described on the Tufts website and are available to all investigative staff members. The veterinarian on-call list is provided to the Tufts Police Department.  Prior to any period of time during which the veterinarians are not available by phone or pager, the attending veterinarian makes specific arrangements with a qualified laboratory animal specialist for veterinary coverage.

Research staff members are provided guidance in the areas of model selection, animal handling, animal restraint, anesthesia, analgesia, euthanasia, surgery, and post-surgical care.

The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee established by Tufts University, in accordance with the requirements of the law, will review, approve, and perform a congruency review of the proposed procedures prior to the award of funding. The IACUC review requires the description of the phenotype of any mice bred in the facility and the DLAM staff are informed of any phenotypes that may cause clinical manifestations. The IACUC also requires that specific monitoring and clear endpoints be listed in the IACUC protocol.

The animal care and use program at Tufts University in Medford holds a current USDA research license under the research license 14-R-0084 and holds the Public Health Service Policy Assurance number A3115-01. The animal care and use program maintains compliance with these regulatory bodies.